Monday, 14 November 2016

As The Leaves Fall

Life has changed recently. Somewhat like the transition from warm, earthy late Autumn to where we are now- damp, chilly early Winter with the ever present threat of ice and snow. I defrosted my car for the first time since February the other morning. Jack Frost had visited overnight and cast beautiful swirls of glittering silver over the windscreen and I'll admit part of me was somewhat saddened as the deicer cut through and melted away his carefully constructed patterns.

Life- thankfully- has bought about a more welcome change, in the shape of work. I knew that -unlike most graduates- I was pretty much guaranteed a job at the end of my degree. I'm sure I don't need to delve into the world of the NHS for you to understand the sad predicament we currently find ourselves in, however Nurses are always in short supply and therefore I was always comforted in the knowledge that work would always be available for me. Now it just so happens that I landed myself the very job I had dreamed of since the start of my training in 2013 and I still cannot believe I managed that as it was my very first interview and my heart was thrumming like a hummingbirds all the way through. But yet, here we are!

Be brave and Believe in yourself!

I started full time work (for the second time in my life) in mid August and as you always do, I felt a little overwhelmed with the new routine, names and systems that I needed to learn and remember to ensure my practise was effective and safe. The days, weeks and months flew by until November arrived and with it a much welcomed week off.

Me and Ash took the opportunity to grab some time away for a couple of nights in Whitstable, back at the fisherman's huts that I'd stayed in before. Farming can mean that time away is infrequent and therefore precious, these couple of days in early November will be the only 'away' time me and Ash get this year and because of the brief time frame we have we always stick fairly local. 

The weather was windy and wet the first day but that didn't stop us bracing ourselves for a coastal stroll among the sailing boats which whistled and clanged in the gusts that howled in from the foaming, grey sea. It certainly cleared our heads and ensured our curly hair was suitably roughed up in time for a meal in a swanky bistro. We nibbled on local bread, mussels and skate for dinner before crossing over the road into the comfort of a village pub to compliment our already full bellies with local ale and cider. After warming ourselves in front of the fire we braced ourselves against the wind once more and headed back to our cosy hut and one of the best nights sleep I've had in along time.

  The morning after we strolled around the wonderful village (on second thoughts perhaps its classed as a small town?) of Whitstable and the many beautiful shops that stocked locally produced treasures from  artists, farmers, fisherman and writers. We stopped to have lunch in a rustic delicatessen before wandering on down to a lovely little seaside house with a shed full of clay, pottery wheels, a huge kiln and a lovely lady clothed in dusty overalls waiting to impart her knowledge of working with clay on us for a couple of hours. 

Carol was without doubt a real gem of knowledge and very patient with me as I had my very first (wobbly) go at throwing! I'm quite proud to say that I didn't do as badly as what I thought I would. Ashley (as I've mentioned before) is one of those people who is annoyingly good at most things first time. He was far more at home than I was with manipulating the clay into bowls of different shapes and sizes while I giggled my way through two ashtray like objects. I'm still very impressed with myself for achieving a couple of very shallow bowls, which I will eat cereal out of somehow!
If you ever find yourself in or around Whitstable be sure to treat yourself to a lesson with Carol, its so much fun and you might surprise yourself with your ability like I did!

We returned home with our tummies a little fuller, our hands a little dustier, our hair significantly curlier and our breath certainly saltier. I return to work later today for a night shift, truth be told I've missed work. I worked hard for three years because I desperately wanted to be a nurse and now that I am I can't describe how much I love it. It's hard sometimes and my back and hands protest after a three day block, but its worth it and when I get home at night I don't complain about how long my day has been, instead I focus on what I enjoyed and what I felt I achieved for either myself or patients.

Wednesday, 5 October 2016


Winds are turning and shadows are lengthening, the vibrant pinks, yellows, greens and blues are fading into glowing reds, browns and oranges, and there are faint whispers in the air of white weather returning to claim the fields, waterways and bare trees. 

It's not Autumn yet.......

But this fire coloured Maid will be along soon, working her dusky magic on the many varieties of leaves that still cling bravely to their trees and breathing cold air into the cracks under doors, slithers between windows and gaps under floorboards. 

...... But it's not Summer.

 This time of year means cultivation: the turning over, breaking up, skimming over and general disturbing of the soil. The stubble left over from harvest disappears under the plough and is replaced with deep brown soil, rich in growth and a perfect blank canvas on which to nurture next years yield. I think that's what I love most about farming; the age old cycle of the earth, come rain or shine farming continues, it laughs in the face of these 'big world problems' and carries on with its business, it doesn't have time to stop, it doesn't care to linger in the bright lights of the hyper media world. It's got a job to do.

 Walking up to Ash earlier on the tea run, hair blowing wildly in the wind I reflected on the visual changes since my last walk up to the top fields. I've always found the end of Summer days quite mystical, there is something magical in the way the scenery changes so quickly before Winter takes hold and diminishes the warmth in more ways than one. I do not like Winter, I feel alive in the warmer months, I connect with the earth and people better, I like my Vitamin D and Winter withholds this from me. But October is the time where I ready myself for the mini hibernation I withdraw into until late March/early April, I make the most of the dwindling warm sun, of the light mornings and the late blooming flowers. The smell of soil coming from the fields is one of my most favourite scents ever (its on parr with cut grass and Turkish delight) and its this time of year when I will bundle up in woolly cardigans and stroll through the arable land just taking in all the sights, sounds and smells. 

 The Rayburn will be lit soon, that's how I know Summer is properly over and the cold, soggy wheelbarrow trips to collect firewood begins. Waking up and feeling the cold press against the skin on your cheek and gently coaxing yourself to haul yourself out the warm pit and get dressed as quickly as you can. 

 Hmmm, I'm really not looking forward to it at all...... however I do like porridge and its really only socially acceptable to indulge in porridge in colder months. Oh and slow cooked stews with dumplings and buttery toast to dunk on the side. And hot chocolate before bed. And pumpkin carving. And (dare I say it?) the distant sound of sleigh bells..........

 Do you like this time of year? 

 Do you have any memories relating to early Autumn?

 Are you a Summer Sunshine or Autumn Maid? If either?!

Sunday, 4 September 2016

The Blur of Summer and- oh!- a Surprise!

Well, hello there. It's been a few months hasn't it? 

Shall we skip the excuses- of which I have many, but none of real interest?

Shall we, lets!

 The later, hotter days of July bought about the final days of Uni. The tying up of loose ends, the double checking all the details, making sure we had everything completed and handed in- crotting the i's and dossing the t's, that sort of thing. I must say that it is an immense relief to be done with academic work, its not my party and the London commute was starting to wear extremely thin. I am not designed for that life, I am a slow goer of all things and the hustle and bustle just doesn't sit well with this floaty head of mine. However I would be fibbing if I didn't admit that I will miss a few select people from my course. You don't realise until you come out the other side how much you have grown and changed as a person and it was wonderful to recognise that in my fellow nurses. We have achieved so much, both as a group and an individual.

 The middle of August saw me start at my new place of work- which, because of rather strict confidentiality aspects I cannot disclose very much about, other than its nursing and I love it! 

But lets be honest.....

 July and August mean one thing in the farming world: Harvest.

 The days become dusty and dusky, they stretch out in front of you forever ruled by the changing of weather and the willingness of a tired and grumpy piece of machinery (and farmer!!) to cooperate. 

 The grass in the fields reaches to the sun and begins to yellow, it provides the perfect environment for all manner of wildlife and during the beginning of July I stumbled across a lady pheasant sheltering her precious eggs from my great galumphing farm boots. She gave me the evil eye and dared me to come closer- I promptly apologised and heading in the opposite direction, only to then land flat of my face falling over the sheep dog that had decided to tag along silently for my midday walk (much to my complete obliviousness). 

 I spent a few days bumping around on a rather uncomfortable seat in one of the tractors while Ash made hundreds of perfect rectangular bales of varying sizes in our grass fields and eventually in the oat fields after the combine had hunkered through, collecting the yield and storing it up ready to be emptied into the waiting grain trailers (of which I managed to dodge this year because of starting work... *silent whoop*).

 At the end of the season your left feeling dusty, tired, tanned and achy after stacking little bales in the barn and walking miles and miles to deliver vital cups of tea and cake to dusty (did I mention dust already? It's very dusty!) farmers stuck up the fields in their tractors and combines. 

(DUST!!! Dust everywhere!!!)

But after all that you are left with a feeling of utter satisfaction. I cannot describe how good it feels to watch the different stages a crop field goes through during the course of harvest to return to its original form. From the lush golden heads of Oats (or Wheat, or Barley) that sway in the wind, like the breeze enjoys running its many fingers through the crop to create wave like formations. To the great, hulking combine that slowly combs the field, swallowing the crop in neat lines and tossing out the left over straw in long hills of yellow. Then the tractor and baler comes through, again swallowing up the stem of the crop, smashing and squeezing and compressing until it bumps out the back of the baler in bale form. This description is far more eloquent than my explanation to children: "the machine swallows the straw and poos out little rectangles!". Then along comes the JCB to collect all the bales up onto a trailer to be taken back to the farm, when everybody and their dog are called upon to unload and stack them neatly in the barn for the coming year. At the end of this the field is left looking like a blond mans 5 o'clock shadow: slightly prickly but also neat and smooth. Now its in for abit of a wait, until early autumn when the tractors return with their cultivating equipment, to prepare the ground for next year. 

 You learn alot from this, about the yearly cycle and how everything in life is in fact very similar. Everything loops, nothing really has a beginning and end. Just a cycle that continues on its familiar path.

 So whats this surprise then?

 You may have already guessed it?

 Yup, I'm doing that really annoying thing people in their twenties do.

 Now, we're taking this as no big deal. Ash didn't get down on one knee, there wasn't a romantic night spent against a rustic backdrop, there were no tears of surprise or happiness. It was just a conversation..... does that disappoint you? 

 Thing is, neither me or Ash like to make a fuss about anything. We don't like attention, we don't like drama and we certainly will not conform to peoples expectations ;) 

We just decided one night to get married because it felt right, it felt natural and it was something we wanted. We've been together for a very long time, we've watched others go through the process as well wishing bystanders and celebrated the uniqueness of everybodies different ideas and beliefs. We have enjoyed being apart of peoples 'Big Day' and have loved playing apart in that to make their day as wonderful as they hoped it would be. 

 Now its our turn and we hope everyone will understand our uniqueness and want to celebrate and enjoy our significantly smaller 'Big Day'. Because of course, it's not going to be done the usual way- duh!!

 In fact if we're totally honest, its just a fun excuse to get everybody we love and appreciate together with music, fun, food, tents, BBQs and plenty of alcohol. I'm hoping to organise (God help me!) a bit of a festival themed fun day where we can both feel at home (because we will be) and relaxed because there's no 'I do's' on that day, theres no big lead up to a serious signing and exchanging of vows- that will come a little while later with a very small group of close family and a very low key exchanging of vows and signing of seriousness. 

Sound odd?

Good ;) 

Sunday, 29 May 2016

Let's go to the Seaside...

 The past three years have proven to be perhaps the most difficult trio of my life- so far! University living did not come naturally to me and I will admit that I struggled the vast majority of the time with the academic requirements and travel. It felt alien to me, all this rush and living to a restricting schedule which didn't allow me to drift off in the way only a Pisces can (ie, totally adrift on their way to Lala Land!). 

Now however, I can!!

 To celebrate being signed off as a children's nurse, me and a friend packed our overnight bags and set off in search of Whitstable; a little seaside town in Kent that holds character by the bucket load! Funky little shops selling the most beautiful clothes, shoes, gifts, art and knick knacks. Bakeries that sing their wares of Belgium buns, gypsy tarts, deliciously stuffed pasties and bikini clad gingerbread's, as you wander along the quaint high street in search of other treasures to gaze longingly at. 

 One such shop was The Whiting Post which -as you can see- had the most amazing display of RICE home ware that I have ever seen... just look at all those colours! 

 Whitstable is also pretty well known for its Oyster festival, so it wasn't long before we stumbled upon a gigantic pile of oyster shells while blowing the cobwebs out along the sea front.

 Now, while I will admit that I'm not much of a fan of the Oyster delicacy I had to help myself to a couple of these for keepsakes, I plan to dot them around in my herb garden this year (as long as the goat doesn't help herself- again!).

 We decided to really treat ourselves accommodation wise for this little getaway. I had spotted the converted Fisherman Huts before when walking along the wooden walkway which runs parallel to the beach and had commented on how much I loved them.

 I booked Hut 11: two double beds, a tiny little kitchen and a snazzy bathroom. Perfect for me and my friend to relax in when we weren't off exploring the town and its many places to eat and drink.

 Snuggling down into this bed after a day of eating fish and chips, meandering along the sea front feeling the wind blow away all the 'uniness' of the past few years, and maybe a glass of rose (or two) was absolute bliss and waking up to the sound of gulls, the gentle lap of waves and the cheery calls of fisherman coming back to port made me so chilled and happy :)

 I plan to return to this quirky little place with my farmer in tow later on in the year, after harvest and a few months after I will have started as a fully qualified nurse in my new job (skweeeee!!). It was stunning and I really cannot recommend it enough if you fancy a little seaside getaway.

Monday, 23 May 2016

Slow and Happy Living

Before you read this post I'm going to ask you to do something really clique:

Take a deep breath in,

Look up from the screen 

and notice something.......

breath out.

 What did you notice? 

 I noticed that the train I'm on was clackiting past a meadow field. If I hadn't of told myself to do the above, I would have missed it. I wouldn't have thought 'oh, that's really colourful' or 'I'd like to walk there'. I would have missed out, I would have continued to tip tap on the keyboard while something really pretty passed me by with no recognition. 

Now answer me this: do you feel calmer?

 I do. Because I saw something outside of my immediate little world and that's refreshing. Its a relief to know something else exists and has a purpose outside of my life. I find that comforting somehow.

I've been doing this alot lately; taking stock of the wider world rather than shutting down and retreating into my hectic, unorganised land. I know why, its because I've come to the end of my degree and can afford to take a step back, loose my concentration and appreciate things which aren't essay or placement or exam orientated. 

 I have to admit, I am so happy to have come to the end of this journey. I have loved learning to be a nurse, I have found it incredibly rewarding, heartbreaking and enlightening. But it wasn't really within my comfort zone; I like home, not travelling up to London for 12 and a half hour shifts. I like to explore, not be cooped up inside in front of a computer writing an essay I do not understand. I like to spend time on my own listening to music, not surrounded by revision papers with pathophsiology and observation parameters.

 I suppose what I'm trying to say is that I feel free. I feel like I'm getting back to who I am and reconnecting with my surroundings.

 The point of this blog post is to raise awareness of the importance to take time to be slow in life. To stop rushing round, trying to get stuff done last minute and falling over your own jumbled thoughts. Just slow down- I'm not saying stop, because at the end of the day things need to be done and completed- and evaluate what you want to really do, not what you feel you should be doing.

 I've really embraced the idea of "slow living" since completing my degree, one because I now have the time to focus on it and two, because I've always been heading in that direction but my mind has never quite been in the right space to explore it fully. 

 I'm never going to be able to pull of the minimalistic lifestyle, because I love things too much. You know the stuff I mean: kick knack's, pointless but pretty objects, sentimental items- the list is endless. I don't find clutter distracting or messy, I find it interesting and a source of nostalgia to be surrounded by these things. But I like to think that just because I am unable and unwilling to live the minimalistic lifestyle, it doesn't stop me appreciating slow living.

 If this sounds like a way of life you may enjoy, then I suggest checking out the Let it Be podcast. I listen to this when I'm doing housework, going for a walk or run, feeling contemplative or just fancy being enlightened to be more aware of the parts of my life I take for granted.

 Let me know if this is something you'd be interested in hearing more about, or indeed its something you think you'd like to incorporate into your life.

Saturday, 7 May 2016

Liebster Blog Award!

 Blogging is something that allows me to divert creative energy into a community of open minded and accepting people. It brings me happiness to read other peoples blogs and escape into their world as I read the lines of unique writing styles, drift into absolutely stunning photography and dance to the beat of somebody else's drum. I started blogging because I felt I had something to contribute, because Romney Marsh farm life is pretty unique and beautiful and is something I believe should be shared and enjoyed by people from far flung places. Overall, I blog for others to enjoy and it's so wonderful to hear from people who do!

 Kay from Deep in the Cornish Countryside has nominated me for the Liebster Blog award, something which- if I'm honest- I had no idea existed until she enlightened me! So I was walking round for most of the day like a puffed up pigeon when I had that little ping! from my phone alerting me to her comment on my blog. I'm really am very grateful Kay, and everybody go have a nosey at her wonderful posts if you haven't already :)

liebster.png (332×222)

 So how does it work? 
Glad you asked ;) here are the 'rules':

1- Say Ta to the person who nominated you and pop a link to their blog in your post
2- Copy and paste the snazzy Liebster award sticker to your post
3- Answer the questions you were asked by your lovely blogger friend
4- Nominate 5 other bloggers that you love to follow
5- Create 10 new questions for these bloggers (this took me flippin' ages!)
6- Notify the bloggers you've nominated

So here are Kay's 10 Questions to me:

1-What is your favourite meal?

 For a long time it was the full on Sunday Roast- chicken to be exact. Roasties done with Marmite, gravy made from the meat juices and a cheeky broccoli cheese if I was feeling really adventurous. However that all changed when I took a trip to Venice with my Mum a few years ago. I had THE pizza: proper Italian Pizza! It was nearly the size of the table the base was that thin. The sauce could have been made by the tomato gods themselves and the cheese was like nothing I have ever tasted. I am converted! If I hadn't have fallen head over heels for my farmer I think I would have hunted down an Italian chef and cast a love spell on them ;)

2-What has been your best ever bargain buy?

 It's got to be this beauty:


 I got this off ebay for a friend's wedding a couple of years ago for- now you may want to sit down- £20!!!!! Amazing?!? It was originally used for a vintage photo shoot and was no longer required, so I have no idea if there is another like it as it doesn't have a label. The material is really good quality and the best thing about it? It's got pockets, proper pockets that I can fit my phone and money in. I am still chuffed to bits with this buy and its the piece of clothing that never fails to make me feel wonderful when I wear it!

3-What are your top 3 favourite films?

Jurassic Park (the first one) because I'm a massive dinosaur nerd. 
Miss Potter because its just a wonderful, wonderful portrayal of a very talented lady
The Great Escape because, well: Steve McQueen ;)

4-If you could invite 3 people for dinner, either living or dead, who would it be?

Number one would be Enid Blyton because she had such a massive impact on my childhood; I was obsessed with the Famous Five adventures and always pretended I was part of the gang. She influenced me to see beyond the computer games and mobile phones that were slowly taking over my generation, instead I took myself off on my bike to the sea side (a 24 mile bike ride- at just 12 years old my mother was not impressed with that one!) or dissapeared off for hours at a time to play in the woods. Enid, would you mind bringing the Ginger Beer please?
Number two would be good ol' Flo (Florence Nightingale) because I'm a nurse and how she revolutionised nursing practice is something to be greatly admired and remembered by all who continue her hard work in nursing. Flo would make sure we all washed our hands the proper way before we tucked into our feast!
Number three would be Miss Emma Watson, because (now don't flee) I am a feminist. How and why I am happy to share in another blog post, but ultimately its because there is still gender inequality on both sides in this age and that's not really something I'm comfortable with. Emma spoke very passionately regarding the HeforShe campaign concerning gender inequality in our time- go watch :)

5-What was the last book you read?

 A Year of Marvellous Ways..... again. Seriously this book is amazing. It encompasses so many things that I love: Cornwall, magical realism, old time love.... I wrote a review of it a while ago because I enjoyed it that much. You can have a looksy here if you like!

6-You are stuck in a well and the cast of the last television programme you watched are coming to rescue you ..... who will be hauling you out? (Mine would be the cast of Gardeners World, I watched an episode I recorded a while back last night before bed lol)

 So I'm not much of a TV watcher, I like YouTube and reading mostly. I suppose the last thing I actually watched was the Downton Abbey Christmas special. I'm quite liking the idea of the cast hauling me up out of a well- I wonder if Lady Mary would mind me trying on a few of her dresses?!

7-Marmite .... Love it or Hate it?

 As I mentioned in my first answer, I do like a good dollop on my roast potatoes. So I'm a lover (sorry).

8-If you could have a super-power, what would it be?

 This is a real nursey answer, but it would be to make people feel better. Whether that be emotionally or physically. I just want to make people happy and comfortable with life because then everything else will just fall into place.

9-What did you have for breakfast this morning?

 Er, I'm not sure this is a very good portrayal of my diet but it was a Dairy Milk chocolate bar! Only because my farmer had been to the pub the night before and brought it back for me as a treat but I was already snoozing in bed. Normally I have overnight oats in a Muller light yoghurt. It makes me feel better knowing I went for a 5k run after I had the chocolate bar!

10-What is the one thing that makes you think of Summer

So, its an accumulation of three things, but all normally done at the same time (cheater alert!!). Bare feet, dusty tractor driving and harem trousers. Bare feet because your lucky if you catch me with anything at all on my feet during summer. Dusty tractor driving because that's inevitably where I end up for a few days of the hottest days, either turning hay or carting massive trailers of bales back to the farm. Harem trousers because I just find them so comfortable, I always make sure that I buy Thailand makes because I know they will be beautifully thin and floaty- perfect for hot, sunny days (spent in tractors)!

 So there you go, those are my questions answered- Thank you again Kay, I really enjoyed coming up with answers for these!

Here are my nominees:

1- Charlotte at The Tea Drinking English Rose. A fellow Kentish blogger and wonderful new Mama, her posts take me to pastel paradise!

2- Alex at On Serpentine Shores. A Cornish blogger who never fails to inspire me to live life a little more simply and find love in everyday life.

3- Sarah at The Salty Sea Blog. Yet another Cornish Blogger who I feel is very similar to me in that her feet aren't meant to be attatched to this little place we call the 'real world'!

4- Hannah at Hannah Witton. A Youtuber who I have been sunsribed to for years, she makes video's concerning sexual health, feminism and other important/contraversial topics. She inspired me to be more opened minded and accepting of how others view the world and where they see themselves in it.

5- Rachael at Vintage Folly. Again, somebody else I've been following for years. A wonderful lady who inspires me in so many things from day to day. I also want half her wardrobe, some seriously cute dresses over there!

And here are my 10 questions for you:

1- Favourite flower and why

2- A scent that makes you happy

3- If you could be any mythical creature, which would you be?

4- Your proudest moment to date

5- Your favourite window- this could be because of the view, location, shape, colour- whatever!

6- The last time you really laughed

7- What's the best: sunrise, midday, sunset or moon?

8- What's your best joke?

9- Can you touch your toes without bending your knees? (I just want to make you get up and try really!)

10- If you could walk anywhere, from any time where would it be?

 So there you go! I apologise if my nominee's have already been nominated before- I'm still pretty new to this blogging thing and am trying to find my way about- I really enjoy all of your blogs and wanted to highlight them for others to enjoy!

Have fun :)

Wednesday, 20 April 2016

The Farm (Spring)

 This is the time of year the farm begins to rumble. With its old, well used cogs slowly starting to turn, laboriously at first as their tired and stiff after the winter but soon the rusty wheels loosen up and begin to purr their familiar grumble and take a deep breath in to greet the upcoming Spring and leap into a well rehearsed routine that is old as time. 

  Buds begin to appear on the apple tree's in the old orchard, these loyal companions of the farm have taken root and claimed the small paddock as their own for longer than either you or I have been here, yet every year without fail they produce their wares as competent and masterful as ever. 

 The Bluebells swiftly follow the Daffs in their colourful bloom and adorn the road side of the garden, along with the long wild grass and occasional bramble. The Bluebells always remind me of summers as a small child in what I used to call our 'wild garden'. My parents and I used to live in a house with a very long garden, so much so that the lawn mower and all our extension leads put together (safety first!!) would not permit it to cut away at the very end- the result was a natural meadow that grew all kinds of beautiful flowers and grass that was so tall it used to tickle my chin. I'd spend hours just sitting within this grassy capsule making friends with insects and on one memorable occasion, a grass snake (I think my Mother still has nightmares!).

 These guys are raring escape their barn which they have been kept in over winter. They are not happy bunnies at the moment watching the sheep play in their field through the gates, but it wont be long until they are free to roam their pasture, with hopefully a few babies in tow by that time too!

But, of course. This is what your here for:

 Yes, here in the land of farming Spring means one thing: LAMBS!

And lambs!!!

 This year our lambing total was 600, that's ewes not lambs and we had a fair few twins (and about 6 sets of triplets!), so lets do the math.... defiantly over 800 new woolly mouths to feed, but an actual figure is a little tricky to obtain without falling asleep ;) 

 Lambs are wonderful creatures, they have the ability to make you smile even when every bone in your body aches from the walking, your eyes feel like lead from the sunrise mornings and late nights and your mental state is not quite up to anything other than putting one foot in front of the other. They run along the ditch banks in little packs, skipping, bleating and racing each other up and down, in and out of the ditch spoil dumped in the field. They are just so happy to be alive. They've done studies to determine the reason why lambs skip, and their oh so scientific conclusion was: because their happy....... I don't like to think just how much money went into funding that crucial research!

 But, yes is the answer to every bodies question. Yes, it is amazing :)

 Now, I don't do anywhere near as much towards the lambing as what Ash does. He's up at 4:30 wandering around the fields, making sure the right lambs are with the right mums, that lambs which have just been born are getting their mums milk, helping ewes which are struggling to birth their lamb and all sorts of other situations sheep manage to get themselves into. Lambing is hard, it is one of the most mentally challenging times on a farm and I have great admiration for my boyfriends persistence and endless hard work to ensure it goes as smoothly as what it can. 

 I help out with the feeding of sock lambs (lambs without a Mum) and the generally easier lambing tasks, with placement and my commute I'm not really able to give all that much without burning myself out too- something which I can't so when I need to be on the ball looking after unwell children.

 Lambing will be over soon and then we will start to hear the distant sound of harvest and hay making approaching. Long, hot, dusty days await the farm in the upcoming months but this humble way of life breathes with the seasons, even when the seasons are against it. It is forever adapting to a world that insists on changing its deep rooted traditions and routines. The farm is stronger than any other industry, it is who we- as humans- are: growers, of all things. 

 I hope you enjoyed this post, its been a little while coming and -if I'm being completely honest- I really struggled to get good pictures of the lambs because they are forever on the go and appear as a blur in my camera screen! 

 Until next time, enjoy what Spring has to offer.